Why is it so important to get the right training when you implement a new system?

For many businesses, investing in a new software system involves a large financial outlay and so the prospect of paying for training to use it does not seem at all appealing. Many people underestimate training when using software and go for the ‘I’ll work it out’ approach – to save time and money after the initial purchase. Here are 5 reasons not to do that:

1. Save time and money in the long run

It may be painful, but by going through the motions now you will save yourself hours of frustration and headaches later on! By getting your team fully trained by the professionals, they will simply be able to get on with their jobs having had minimal disruption. But leave them to figure it out alone and the hours spend sorting out problems and issues with your software may well add up.

2. Get a return on your investment

You’ve bought your new package for a reason, whether that was to become more efficient and productive or to produce a certain report or set of stats. So it is important that you and your team know exactly how to get the results that you set out to achieve, otherwise you’ve wasted your time.

3. One size doesn’t fit all!

It is easy to think that you can Google your way through a system set up and ask a mate who’s got a similar system how to do X, Y and Z. But it is important to remember that every business operates differently and has purchased the software for different reasons. So to get the most out of it, you need to know how to make it work for your individual company.

4. Find smarter ways to work

A trainer/consultant will know the software system inside out and will be able to advise you on any shortcuts or new processes that will benefit your business. Their expertise and fresh eyes could well help to cut down on some of your day to day activities.

5. Motivate staff to use it

It’s hard to get used to a new system and if staff aren’t 100% confident in using it then they are likely to carry on their jobs as before. When pressured or busy, it is often easier just to get on with a task the way you know how, rather than to try and teach yourself something new.